Posts Tagged ‘Venice’

Wandering: Rome, Venice, and Middle Earth

April 3, 2019
  • The wonderful Joseph Epstein, who is making more hay of his Roman reading project than I am, writes charmingly of the life of Julius Caesar, whom he, rather cheekily, calls Big Julie.
  • Speaking of Rome, William Edmund Fahey writes a thoughtful meditation on the city by way of an introduction to Hawthorne’s final, Roman novel The Marble Faun. By such means does the reading list increment.
  • It might seem incredible, but not everybody likes visiting Rome, or indeed the other great Italian cities. Some people even complain.
  • Although even I might complain, at least once, if I went to Venice and found it flooded. Having unburdened myself, I hope I would find a way to enjoy the watery wonderland.
  • Bradley Birzer reviews, appreciatively, The Fall of Gondolin, the most recent volume in which Christopher Tolkien, in a continuing labour of “love and piety”, has brought his father’s unfinished writing to print. I hadn’t thought to read it, but I’m re-considering.
  • At the New Yorker, Bob Moser writes a scathing exposé of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a “marketing tool for bilking gullible Northern liberals” that has excelled at finding “hate groups” where the rest of us saw only their political opponents.
  • Finally, Terry Teachout writes, also appreciatively, about the music of Chopin.

For an envoi, here is the first of Chopin’s Nocturnes, played by the — in Chopin — unsurpassable Artur Rubinstein: