Posts Tagged ‘Notre Dame de Paris’

Around and about, Notre-Dame edition

August 1, 2019
  • The New York Times has run a harrowing account of what happened, hour by hour, during that awful day in April when Notre-Dame de Paris went up in flames. Riveting reading.
  • Witold Dybczynski writes about the troubling French politics surrounding the repairs and reconstruction of the church, and gives historical perspective on how reconstruction after disaster has been handled in other famous cases.
  • At The New Criterion, Peter Pennoyer covers some of the same ground, but goes into detail about the philosophy that motivated the extensive reconstructon of Notre-Dame that Viollet-le-Duc undertook in the mid-nineteenth century.
  • Andrew Thompson-Briggs reviews the massive two-volume work Aesthetics that Dietrich von Hildebrand wrote in his final years. I’d actually been lazily circling around these books, wondering if I should take the lure, but this review has put me off for the time being. As reservoirs of critical judgments the books sound excellent; but as advancing a philosophical argument they sound idiosyncratic, and I don’t need 1000 pages of idiosyncracy at this stage in my life.
  • The only thing I like about Twitter is the opportunity it affords to call its users “twits”. And I guess I also like that one of its architects has trouble sleeping at night.
  • I once read an interview with the Hilliard Ensemble in which they lamented the frequency with which their audience would blandly describe as “so relaxing” a piece of music that had been strewn with hair-raising difficulties, suffused with intelligence, and animated by transcendent yearning. I was reminded of this when reading a funny but also sad account of how classical music gets treated by marketers.
  • At Image Journal, novelist Christopher Beha lists his ten favourite novels of the past 30 years. I am not sure any very great novels have been written in that period, and his list, at least, leaves me still in doubt. Infinite Jest may have a legitimate claim; I was only able to get through about 1/3 of it, so I’m no judge. The only other of those on his list that I know is Dillard’s The Maytrees, which I appreciated but am not wildly enthusiastic about. I’d be interested to know if anyone reading here would concur with or contest his judgments.

For an envoi, let’s hear one of those so relaxing pieces from the Hilliard Ensemble. Close your eyes and waft along with this:

After the fire

April 24, 2019

A week on from the fire, I can uncover my eyes and see what happened. What a joy to see this:

Notre-Dame was my first Gothic cathedral. I went to Paris when an undergraduate, on my first trip to Europe. I arrived in the early morning hours, before I could check-in at my lodgings, so I walked to Notre-Dame. I remember arriving in the plaza before the church, and gazing up at her in wonder, hardly believing that she was real, and that I was really seeing her with my own eyes. I threw my backpack down on a bench and sat, simply taking in that beautiful facade. I remember that I glanced along the bench at another traveller, also toting a backpack, and roughly my age. He said to me, in English, “I had to see her again before leaving”. I simply nodded in understanding. When I heard about the fire, among the many thoughts that crowded my mind were these: where is he now, and what is he feeling this day?

The damage, thanks be to God, seems to be not as devastating as was originally feared. The firefighters of Paris are genuine heroes in this affair. The north tower was apparently threatened most nearly — threatened by the bells, which, if their wooden supports had burned, would have plunged down the length of the tower and collapsed it. The firefighters mobilized to rescue the many treasures, sacred and artistic, which the church housed. I was most touched by the story of the chaplain to the Paris firefighters, Fr Jean-Marc Fournier, who rescued the Blessed Sacrament from the tabernacle and the crown of thorns reliquary. I was also amused to learn that the Parisian fire brigade deployed a secret weapon against the fire: Colossus, a fire-fighting robot.

One of the treasures of the church, after its relics, rose windows, and facade, is its organ. I attended an organ recital there some years ago, and remember it fondly. Here is a short documentary featuring it:

Much has been written about the church, about what it means to Parisians and to the French nation, and about its significance for Catholics around the world. Quite a few writers have been tempted by the metaphorical potency of a burning cathedral in the center of secularized Europe. Without denying that they have a point, such reactions seem to me tactless at this point. The church burned, and that is more than enough to reckon with, without having it turned into a lecture illustration or commandeered for partisan gain.

Having said that, I admit I cannot help taking heart, under the circumstances, from images like this, which are like an Easter homily in themselves:

Macron has committed to rebuilding what was damaged, and there have been a number of absurdly large donations from absurdly rich French citizens, along with a stream of modest donations from lovers of the cathedral around the world. I made a small donation myself. We hear rumours of our cultured despisers wanting to turn this monument honouring Our Lady into a monument honouring Ourselves. I hope and pray that they are thwarted. May the beautiful church of Notre-Dame de Paris be protected from the hands of Daniel Libeskind, I.M. Pei, and all like-minded vandals. Let us love her even in her infirmity.

Notre Dame

April 15, 2019

There could be some dispute about what is the greatest church in the world. In my heart, though, Notre Dame de Paris is first. A heartbreaking day.

 

Feast of All Saints, 2009

November 1, 2009

all-saints

They are present still!  We are not solitary though we seem so.  Few now alive understand or sanction us; but those multitudes in primitive time, who believed, and taught, and worshiped as we do, still live unto God, and, in their past deeds and their present voices, cry from the Altar.  They animate us by their example; they cheer us by their company; they are on our right hand and our left.  Martyrs, Confessors, and the like, high and low, who used the same Creeds, and celebrated the same Mysteries, and preached the same Gospel as we do.  And to them were joined, as ages went on, even in fallen times, nay, even now in times of division, fresh and fresh witnesses from the Church below.  In the world of spirits there is no difference of parties.

— John Henry Newman, Sermons.

At First Vespers for this great feast is sung Laetamini in Domino. Here is a gorgeous setting by Jean Richafort (c.1480-c.1550), sung by the Huelgas Ensemble.

Laetamini in Domino, et exsultate justi. Et gloriamini, omnes recti corde.

Be glad in the Lord, and rejoice, ye righteous: and shout for joy, all ye that are upright in heart.

At Mass the Gradual is Timete Dominum.  Here is the chant, and below is a recording sung by A Sei Voci.  (You now have everything you need to sing it yourself.)

timete-transparent

Revere the Lord, all you saints of his; for there is no want among those who fear him. Those who seek the Lord shall lack no good thing.

Happy Feast of All Saints!