Posts Tagged ‘George Crumb’

Circular musical notation

February 3, 2018

For no very evident reason I’ve recently come across a few pieces of music for which the score has a peculiar feature: the music is notated in a circle, rather than on the usual linear staves.

The first is a piece by Baude Cordier, a fifteenth-century French composer, which has been preserved in the famous Chantilly Codex. It is entitled Tout par compas suy composes (“From a compass I am composed“), and the title gives a clue to the rationale for the odd notation: this is a circle canon, in which the voices wrap around and repeat, just like a circle, with the two discantus voices singing in canon. This excellent video animates the score so that we can follow along more readily:

This is not the only eccentric score from Cordier; he also notated a love song, Belle, Bone, Sage, in such a way that the staves form a heart.

The second example comes from George Crumb, a 20th century composer. Crumb is rather famous for his unorthodox musical scores. (His score for Black Angels is an extreme example.) Today though we will look at his circular score for The Magic Circle of Infinity, a playful piece for piano. It sounds a bit like a mad music-box, and I can imagine a mad little ballerina spinning on top of it as the score spins.

Another fun score by Crumb is his Spiral Galaxy, which spirals.

Thanks to Jordan Alexander Key for making these videos. His YouTube channel is a good one.